City range by Lea

Urban Underpinning

City range by Lea
City Moscova Antracite by Ceramiche Lea

With a surface that imitates an intricate overhead map of interconnected roads and streets with miniature houses and buildings; Lea Ceramiche’s City range offers a slice of urban chic to the style conscious.

According to Emilio Mussini, the company’s CEO: “It is in Lea Ceramiche’s nature to see design as a concrete value and a real opportunity for growth and development. Technology, experimentation, the ability to propose new territories of ceramic investigation and application, together with passion and a deep knowledge of the materials, are all aspects that belong to the world of design and which have driven us to introduce products of unpublished style and technological potential through the years.”

The strong design content that characterises Lea Ceramiche’s products is typified by the City range. Although it may look like a random mosaic, on closer inspection it is actually an intricate overhead map of interconnected roads and streets with miniature houses and buildings; a bit like zooming out on Google Maps. A new experience in ceramics, the City range offers a slice of urban chic to the style conscious who want to bring a bustling vibe to their interiors. Available in bronze, anthracite and steel, Lea Ceramiche looks set to go down as one of the tile sector’s trend setting collections.

City range by Lea
City Brera Bronze Cordusio

As the company puts it: “Here the material and technological research dedicated to a flexible use of the material finds further space. New production techniques and unusual material matching that look at reality and reinterpret it in surfaces have created a new experience in ceramics, opening this market to a wider public. In City, the urban map becomes more abstract, almost creating a metal effect texture on a bronze, anthracite and steel base.”

The City collection, designed by Diego Grandi, recently won the prestigious Good Design competition organised by the Chicago Athenaeum. The competition, created in 1950 by Edgar J. Kaufmann, claims to be the oldest and most important award in the world.

www.ceramichelea.com

This item first appeared in Tile & Stone Journal, September 2009

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