Florentin by Kaza Concrete

Tetragonal Florets

Florentin by Kaza Concrete
Florentin is a Mercedesz Nagy design for Kaza Concrete

Featuring a triangular motif, Kaza Concrete’s Florentin tile was designed by Mercedesz Nagy.  It is based on the kind of medieval architectural ornamentation used in monastery cloisters.  The tetragonal, half opened, florets were originally designed for meditative and contemplative purposes. Nagy multiplied the pattern and filled the surrounding spaces with asymmetrical rhombuses that create a smooth transition between each Florentin, while also adding in an extra layer of geometry.

Each Florentin tile measures 255 by 295 by 82mm, resulting in a bold yet subtle wall cladding.  Using the petal motif as an alternative to wallpaper or paint creates a dramatic statement that slowly shifts as the sun travels through the sky, changing the angles of the shadows within the relief pattern.

Florentin by Kaza Concrete
Florentin tile is a Mercedesz Nagy design for Kaza Concrete

The Florentin tile creates a sense of direction with its three-point floral, while the added etched design of the rhombus creates an exaggerated sense of depth.   Although none of the pattern within the wall of tiles incorporates straight lines, the linear imagery is strong, making it the perfect foil for both organic and geometric furnishings.

Every Florentin tile is hand-made from a specially-formulated and reinforced concrete fibre called Smart Concrete.  The Smart Concrete process creates a durable raw material that can be adapted to any number of creative design concepts.  Smart Concrete aims to elevate concrete from its industrial origins into the arena of bespoke design due to its fine detail and finesse.

Florentin by Kaza Concrete
Florentin tile is a Mercedesz Nagy design for Kaza Concrete

The manufacturing process used to create these tiles is said to have a small ecological footprint. The concrete cures at room temperature negating the need for kilns and heavy machinery, while the raw materials used are minimal and the moulds are continually reused.

www.kazaconcrete.com

This item first appeared in Tile & Stone Journal, February 2014

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