Invader mosaic

Intrepid Invader

Mosaic street art mural by Invader
Mosaic street art mural by Invader

I am completing this series of posts about ceramic tile street art by looking back to the individual who really started it all.

Invader mosaic
Invader installation in London

Invader is the pseudonym of a French urban artist, born in 1969, whose work is modelled on the crude pixellation of 1970s–1980s 8-bit video games. He took his name from the 1978 arcade game Space Invaders, and much of his work is composed of square ceramic tile mural installations inspired by video game characters. Although he guards his identity carefully, his distinctive creations can be seen in many highly-visible locations in more than 65 cities across 33 countries.

Invader mosaic
Invader installation in London

He documents each intervention in a city as an “Invasion”,  publishes books and maps of the location of each of his street mosaics.

Invader mosaic
N&C advert provides a serendipitous context for London ‘invasion’

In addition to working with tiles, Invader is one of the leading proponents of indoor mosaics created using stacks of Rubik’s Cubes in a style he refers to as Rubikcubism.

Invader mosaic
Invader installation in London

Invader trained at a Parisian art school, and initially derived inspiration from early video games, particularly Space Invaders.  Games of that era were constructed with 8-bit graphics, and so lend themselves well to the mosaic treatment, with each tile representing one pixel.

Invader mosaic
A recent work by Invader

Invader’s first mosaic was installed in the mid 1990s in Paris, but it was several years before the full “invasion” programme was conceived in 1996.

Invader mosaic
A recent work from the latest London ‘invasion’

The first wave of “invasion” began in Paris in 1998,  and then spread to 31 other cities in France. Since then, Invader’s works have appeared around the world.  He has invaded cities such as London, New York and Hong Kong  many times, and has even tagged prominent locations such as the Hollywood Sign.

Invader mosaic
Subtle evidence of a London ‘invasion’

In June 2011, Invader marked the installation of his 1000th work in Paris with an exhibition at La Générale entitled 1000.  By June 2011, 77 cities had been invaded, 2,692 Space Invaders placed comprising some 1.5 million ceramic tiles; and 19 invasion maps have been published.  To combat their removal or damage by building owners, thieves or fans, Invader places many mosaics out of easy reach.

Invader mosaic
Invaders mosaic are now sold as works of art by Sotheby’s, et al

By June 2011, Invader had spent 22 nights in prison cells and accepts arrest as an occupational hazard.  He sees himself as a hacker of public space spreading a virus of mosaic; and deliberately makes his works public by installing them at street level for ordinary people to enjoy on a daily basis.

Invader mosaic
Another London installation flags up Invader’s activity

The sites for the mosaics are scouted and carefully researched. Although many of his works feature the signature aliens, no two pieces are alike.  The subject matter may also be themed and adapted to their context. Invader’s repertoire of subjects now includes Star Wars characters (London), as well as the Pink Panther and Mega Man (Paris).  His works in Hong Kong have a more oriental theme: with martial arts characters and the use of traditional Chinese gold and red colours.

Invader mosaic
Humour is a theme running through the invasions

Invader’s mosaics are half-built in advance.  When Invader arrives in a city, he usually stays in a city for two or three weeks.  He obtains a map and spends at least a week installing the mosaics, which are catalogued (with city code and sequential number), photographed (one close-up and one in its context) and mapped.  He prints and distributes invasion maps within the city he is visiting, and they are later sold in his on-line shop.

Invader mosaic
Mosaics are placed in hard-to-reach locations to prevent damage or removal

This catalogue of the mosaics also serves as the basis for a reality game.  Using the FlashInvaders smartphone app, players can hunt globally for installed pieces.  Using the camera and geolocation functionality, users can submit photographs via the app which are then validated against the catalogued works.

In 2015, in a new strategy to avoid his works from being removed by profiteers, Invader planned a series of art pieces in New York City, putting out a call on social media for building owners who would be willing to host his mosaics legally.

Since about 2004, Invader has been working on another project that involves making artworks exclusively using Rubik’s Cubes: an art form he calls Rubikcubism.  The works are themed along three axes: Bad Men, where he reinterprets villains such as Osama bin Laden, Jaws and Al Capone; Masterpieces where famous paintings by artists such as Delacroix, Warhol, Seurat, Lichentenstein are given a workover; and Low Fidelity based on iconic album art such as Country Life, The Velvet Underground & Nico, and Nevermind.

http://www.space-invaders.com

A new post by Joe Simpson, Diary of a Tile Addict, February 2017 using data from Wikipedia.

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